The Question is Answered!

 

We looked at quite a few properties before buying this house at Moose Pond.  Many times, we asked the question, "What is the difference between a LAKE and a POND?"  We heard quite a few answers, most wrong, but a few people, including our agent (Joyce Barter of Krainin Realty) gave us the right answer.  Which is, "in Maine, it was up to whoever named the body of water".  The Maine Lakes Conservancy, glossary provides the technical answer below. 

LAKE: A permanent, inland body of standing water with no sustained directional flow detectable to the naked eye. In general, a lake has sufficient depth that light does not penetrate all the way to the bottom in the deepest parts of the lake and often stratifies into three distinct layers of water during the summer. Ponds by contrast, have light penetration throughout the body of water and will have only one or two layers during stratification. In Maine, this general rule of distinguishing lakes from ponds was not used in naming the bodies of water.

POND: A permanent, inland body of standing water with no sustained directional flow detectable to the naked eye. Ponds have light penetration all the way across the body of water and will have only one or two layers during summer stratification. Lakes by contrast, have sufficient depth that light does not penetrate all the way to the bottom in the deepest parts of the lake and often stratifies into three distinct layers of water during the summer. In Maine, this general rule of distinguishing lakes from ponds was not used in naming the bodies of water. Therefore some ponds are called lakes and some lakes are called ponds.